Installing HipChat 4 on Fedora/Rhel/CentOS/el 7

HipChat 4 has recently come out, and then shortly after it was released to my companies internal HipChat server. Being a Linux user I hoped that the aged HipChat 2 client was finally updated for Fedora or Red Hat or CentOS 7 so I could just use yum to install it. When I went to the download page the old yum instructions were replaced by only Ubuntu/Debian instructions! After playing around with the Debian package and getting it to load, I thought I would look at the repo a little more. Low and behold, Atlassian is making a yum repo! Just not publishing instructions on how to use it! The downside is they seem to not be signing the repo, but the code below works with yum to download the latest version.

 

sudo bash -c ‘cat > /etc/yum.repos.d/hipchat.repo << EOF_hipchat
[atlassian-hipchat]
name=Atlassian Hipchat
baseurl=https://atlassian.artifactoryonline.com/atlassian/hipchat-yum-client/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0
EOF_hipchat’

sudo yum update

sudo yum install hipchat4

IMG_6349

Building a Tiny Classic Mac Part 2 – Hardware and Wiring

The units themselves are laser cut acrylic. The front face that was put on the painted units was 3D printed. The designs for those pieces are on my GitHub page, https://github.com/daberkow/minimacparts . The original design was a tad bit smaller than the final unit. I ended up making it exactly about 1/3 scale, then realizing that there was not a screen on the market to do what I wanted to do. When I moved up to the 4″ screen, the resolution went up to a incredible 480×320. There were a bunch of issues around that resolution that I will get into in a later article.

For the Raspberry Pi I used a Raspberry Pi 2. The first version I made had a Pi 1 in it, and I ended up upgrading to the 2 just for the speed and added cores. With the system running a emulator, core 1 can get used up by that; having more available made sure things like SSH didnt lock up.

I designed two brackets, one set that holds the screen in place, and another that mounts the Pi to the inside of the case. The screen mounts are just two bars that are the exact with of the screen and help mount it inside, while leaving the port available for the IDE cable. The mount for the Raspberry Pi made it easier to take the Pi in and out of the case when building the unit. And a nice list so the Pi doesn’t get glued or screwed right into the side of the case.

IMG_2385

For the front USB port, I got a USB 3.0, 6 inch cable. The most important part of this cable is finding one with a 90 turn at the end that does not stick out a lot. The Raspberry Pi is mounted in the end to the side wall of the case, and there is not much clearance. A USB cable that comes out from the top of the Pi is better as well. I ordered the wrong one for this last build, and then had to bend it a bit so it wouldn’t push against the side of the case.

IMG_6358

A simple micro-usb extension cable was used for powering the Pi. The female jack goes to the back of the case, so that the unit can be powered. Again, the 90 degree male plug was important because that side sits right next to the screen. Audio was a random 90 degree 3.5mm extension cable off amazon. The first unit, the clear one, had a different make than ones i got later. Some of the later units had a splitter instead of a single extension. The original idea was to have a speaker inside for the start up sound. That quickly added to the complexity and was cut from the final project.

The networking port was important so that I could easily add new programs to it. The systems also had a tiny wifi receiver, but I figured hard wiring was also easy. That was a custom keystone jack to a RJ45 port.

I mentioned in Part 1 that the screen was connected to the Pi via a IDE extension cable. After looking around for other solutions that worked cleanly, this was the best one. The cable can handle the frequencies, and was easy to find. It also doesn’t do any flipping of pins or roll-over shenanigans.

To bring it all together, super glue was used, not the most glamorous, but strong and holds. I made a few little tools to help me try to put better right angles together when gluing the cases. Those didnt always work out great.

IMG_6349

To wrap up, I will go over my build order, just in case anyone decides to try to make one of their own. I would first get the front piece, and glue that to the side walls. Let that dry for a few hours at least, superglue likes to dry fairly fast, but I wanted it to be solid through and through. Then I would add the bottom front panel area, and the sliver that goes between the front bottom, and that bottom panel. After I put the bottom of the unit on, I would stop working on the main body. Now its time to get the screen, with it powered on and working with the Pi, line it up to where it looks good in the cut out.

After I have found the spot the screen should go, put the brackets on it, and glue it into place. This has to be a little carefully done, any spare glue that drips into the screen can make it look bad. Once the screen has dried, getting the mounting arms for the Pi bracket, and gluing them in place was done. There is not a real science to where it went, I would put the whole Pi sled in, then see where it seemed to work well with all the cables attached. Then sharpie those spots and glue the arms down, watching them long enough to make sure they didnt fall over. Once that was done, and I felt good about where the Pi was, I would glue two tiny blocks I 3D printed to hold the Pi sled in place.

Gluing the front USB isnt too bad, its putting it in position then gluing the edge of the extender into the place it should sit. The hardest part is not getting glue in the connector, and doing multiple layers so that it doesnt move with normal user use.

Getting the back to stay in place was my least favorite part. There are little L brackets I 3D printed that the back could screw into. They work well but lining them up and gluing them into place, and not the back itself was tiring. I would tighten the brackets a fair amount to the back plate, then get the plate into position and glue the bottom two brackets into place. Then I would do the top two. At this point gluing the different connectors into the back ports isn’t too bad. I also made brackets for them, the brackets are bigger than the whole so that it covers the whole port when the piece is in it. These brackets weren’t held with little arms like the Pi, just glued into place.

Finally the top was glued in, and then the last little top slant area. The screen I mentioned getting before may not be available from Amazon, but there are a ton of others that are all seem to be made by the same place, then had another brand stamped on them. For the last build I did, I grabbed another brand (link) and it worked with the same drivers out of the box.

Building a Tiny Classic Mac Part 1

I saw online someone who made a tiny Mac (The Verge) and thought it looked like a neat project to attempt. I started by selecting the original Macintosh as the template I wanted to emulate. Macintosh-HelloSeveral people had made 3D models of the original Macintosh over on thingiverse.com, I used a combination of those and other sources online including photos to make a cleaned up model for myself in Sketchup. After having that model I went about breaking down how I would make it.

I recently have been using laser cutters for fun at TechShop, so I made the body of the machine out of clear acrylic. Then 3D printed a face plate that was glued onto the acrylic case. After that, it was painted with several coats of spray paint. I left the back door off so that I could work on installing the electronics, and setting up the software. That will be another article later.

The first unit I made was for myself, then two more for friends; the original one never got painted, I thought the clear body was neat and showed off the internals. It also gave me a good model to hold when working with the opaque other units.

Clear Mini Mac

Mini Mac v1

Each unit had a little screen that connected to a Raspberry Pi via a ribbon cable. Then a USB port in the front where the old unit had a keyboard port. The back had a ethernet port for updating the system itself, audio out, and micro-USB port for power. One of the hardest parts of the project was finding a ribbon cable that could handle the frequencies and work between the screen and the Raspberry Pi. A lot of the GPIO ribbon cables online actually flip what wire is in the 1 position with its neighbor; my solution was a 6 inch IDE extension cable. The cable can handle high frequencies, as well as fit the pin out perfectly.

20150918_152507000_iOS

Example Painted Side

After testing several different color paints, I ended up using Rost-Oleum Ivory Bisque semi-gloss as the beige shade. All the sides were glued together except the back, The back was held on by tiny brackets that were 3D printed and then screwed into. This allows access to the inside without breaking glue somewhere. Originally I was going to attempt to put a little handle on it, but that increased the complexity; in the end the top is flat.

All the laser cutting and 3D files I used I tracked with Git over at https://github.com/daberkow/minimacparts . I will put a few photos of the clear unit below, and of the final unit. Then later post another article about the electronics, and software to run it. There are also photos of the many many attempts at different sized bodies and painting side panels. My original model was almost exactly 1/3rd scale. Then I had to make it a tiny bit bigger because of the screen I used.

Standard disclaimer that I do not own or hold any rights for the Macintosh name, or Apple logo. I do this as a fan for fun.

Parts:

  • Screen, JBtek® Latest Version 4 ” inch IPS Display (Super TFT) 480×320, (Amazon)
  • Screen Cable, IDE Extension Cable, (Amazon)
  • Audio Cable, 3.5mm right angle cable (Amazon)
  • USB Extension cable, with 90 degree plug so that it fits in the case (Amazon)
  • Micro USB extension for power, with 90 degree head (Amazon)
  • For ethernet I made my own cable, it had a RJ45 head and a RJ45 keystone for the back

 

Fixing CentOS 6.6 Kickstart Issues

I recently have been working on a system automating CentOS 6 installs for servers. When upgrading to 6.6 my test environment (VMWare Fusion) stopped working. I got a hard kernel panic and halt on loading. Now VMware forums and CentOS site, have posts about work arounds for this. A bunch of them are complex and involve changing modules around, and other files. There is a very easy fix for this, and its detailed below.

NOTE: I am running VMware Fusion, so I will open a package, in Windows and Linux you dont have to do this, just go to the folder.

  1. Stop the VM
  2. Find the VM files
    1. For Fusion there will be a %Your VM%.vmwarevm file, you have to right click that and “Show package contents”
  3. There should be a %Your VM%.vmx file, open that with a text editor
    1. If you are on a Mac, or other machine that likes to do smart quotes, make sure to use a program like vim or Sublime Text that doest add “smart quotes”
  4. A line will read: ethernet0.virtualDev = “e1000e”, change that to ethernet0.virtualDev = “e1000”, just remove the last e. This changes the card from a E1000 in enhanced mode to a normal one. Now CentOS 6.6 will boot.

Here are some place people have discussed issues:

https://communities.vmware.com/message/2443777

3D Printing Hard Drive Caddies

Sometimes terrible things happen, like when a laptop goes a place where they take the hard drive as it leaves. Then they keep the hard drive bracket because they forgot to take it off! You can get a new drive for ~$50 but where do you get these priceless holders? Well I ran into this situation and decided to 3D print one! Now all IT departments have a real reason to get a 3D printer!

I started a repo at https://github.com/daberkow/3d_harddrive_chassis, and the first laptop I added is a Dell Inspiron N7010, random but it works!

Hard Drive Caddy

Hard Drive Caddy

iDrac6 Recovery Through TFTP and Serial

The History:
This week I had a Dell PowerEdge R510’s iDrac completely die on me; I attempted repairs with several utilities that Dell gives out on their site and all of them ended with failure. I thought it might have been because I upgrade the iDrac from an old version to the latest, without components like the BIOS or NIC, that the iDrac communicates with, being upgraded as well. After upgrading everything, iDrac still was not working, after a few days of messing with it, I found out through piecing together several sites how to force the iDrac in recovery mode to do a TFTP repair, writing a new image to it.

The symptoms:
The system used the Windows iDrac Updater, which stated the update had competed successfully. I then, remotely, told the system to reboot; it shut down and never came back up. When I physically went to the server, it was at the BIOS start screen stating “Error Communicating with iDrac. Press F1 to continue, or F2 for System Setup.” In restarting the server I found that “System Services” were disabled. Then the system would go through normal boot sequence, but when it tried to communicate with the iDrac it would fail then restart the server. After restarting, it would allow a full boot, but would give that same “Press F1 to continue, or F2 for System Setup” message. Thus the server would not boot without physical intervention at the machine.

This is a Dell PowerEdge R510, I attempted to upgrade the iDrac from 1.3.* to 1.6.5.

The Fix:
We need to get to the iDrac’s serial recovery mode, and then we can recover the system.

  1. Reboot the system, and after the system resets itself for not being able to reach iDrac go into “System Setup”, the F2 key
  2. Hit down until you select “Serial Communication”, enter that menu
  3. Set the following settings:
    • Serial System Setup Settings
    • Serial Communication : On With Console Redirection via COM2
    • Serial Port Address : Serial Device 1=COM1, Serial Device2=COM2
    • External Serial Connector : Serial Device 1
      • This could be Remote Access Device, but that gave me problems (I may have had a bad serial cable)
    • Failsafe Baud Rate : 115200
      • For the 11G servers this is the default baud rate
    • Remote Terminal Type : VT100/VT220
    • Redirect After Boot : Enable
  4. Then rebooted the system. I got Windows to start by manually hitting F1
  5. At this point you need to go to support.dell.com, lookup downloads for your system, then under “Embedded Server Management” there is “iDRAC6 Monolithic Release 1.97” (or whatever version is newest)
  6. There are several versions, for my system I got “iDRAC6_1.97_A00_FW_IMG.exe (50 MB)”
  7. After downloading, running this file will extract “firmimg.d6” and a readme file.
    • The readme has no useful information in it, it just tells you to search for the user guide
  8. The “firmimg.d6” file needs to be placed on a TFTP server that the iDrac can hit
  9. Using Putty in Windows I connected the COM2 at 115200 Baud, this is the iDrac being redirected. Connect to your systems Com2 however you can
    • Note all this is being done on the server and nothing is done on a other machine, I had TFTP running on this Windows system
  10. Hitting enter should show a recovery menu
    • Unfortunately I did not save pictures of the recovery screen, some of the next menu options may not be the exact wording
  11. I had DHCP on the network my iDrac was sitting on so I hit 9 to get a IP address, this can also be set manually
  12. Hit 7 to change the TFTP server IP address
  13. Now hit the option that says “Firmware Upgrade”, this will go to the TFTP server specified, download the firmware, and reinstall all pieces of the iDrac from that file. It takes about 5 minutes.
  14. Keep in mind you are in your OS, for me Windows, while the iDrac and its system upgrades and reboots
  15. After it reboots successfully the recovery console stops getting data, I was next to the server, when the iDrac reboots the fans go to full speed then calm back down. That’s how I was able to tell it restarted
  16. Now you can use the RACADM commands if open manage/iDrac tools are installed, or reboot and you should see “System Services” back online, then you can change the IP of the iDrac like normal

Everything should work now and the world is happy!

Updated Windows Sudo

Recently I updated my Windows sudo program and added a command for Super Conduit, this is what I call some tweaks that you can make to a Windows Vista+ system. This allows someone to copy sudo.exe to a systems, system32 folder; then after running “sudo cmd” you can run “sudo /write” so add ls, ifconfig, and superc as a option in the command line.

Superc has options of enable, disable, and show. Making it easy to run.:)

Newest build is always here https://github.com/daberkow/win_sudo/raw/master/sudo/sudo/bin/Release/sudo.exe